PsyResearch
ψ   Psychology Research on the Web   



Couples needed for online psychology research


Help us grow:




Psychological Assessment - Vol 28, Iss 6

Random Abstract
Quick Journal Finder:
Psychological Assessment Psychological Assessment publishes mainly empirical articles concerning clinical assessment. Papers that fall within the domain of the journal include research on the development, validation, application, and evaluation of psychological assessment instruments. Diverse modalities (e.g., cognitive, physiologic, and motoric) and methods of assessment (e.g., questionnaires, interviews, natural environment and analog environment observation, self-monitoring, participant observation, physiological measurement, instrument-assisted and computer-assisted assessment) are within the domain of the journal, especially as they relate to clinical assessment. Also included are topics on clinical judgment and decision making (including diagnostic assessment), methods of measurement of treatment process and outcome, and dimensions of individual differences (e.g., race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, economic status) as they relate to clinical assessment.
Copyright 2016 American Psychological Association
  • Illuminating the theoretical components of alexithymia using bifactor modeling and network analysis.
    Alexithymia is a multifaceted personality construct that reflects deficits in affect awareness (difficulty identifying feelings, DIF; difficulty describing feelings, DDF) and operative thinking (externally oriented thinking, EOT; restricted imaginal processes, IMP), and is associated with several common psychiatric disorders. Over the years, researchers have debated the components that comprise the construct with some suggesting that IMP and EOT may reflect constructs somewhat distinct from alexithymia. In this investigation, we attempt to clarify the components and their interrelationships using a large heterogeneous multilanguage sample (N = 839), and an interview-based assessment of alexithymia (Toronto Structured Interview for Alexithymia; TSIA). To this end, we used 2 distinctly different but complementary methods, bifactor modeling and network analysis. Results of the confirmatory bifactor model and related reliability estimates supported a strong general factor of alexithymia; however, the majority of reliable variance for IMP was independent of this general factor. In contrast, network analysis results were based on a network comprised of only substantive partial correlations among TSIA items. Modularity analysis revealed 3 communities of items, where DIF and DDF formed 1 community, and EOT and IMP formed separate communities. Network metrics supported that the majority of central items resided in the DIF/DDF community and that IMP items were connected to the network primarily through EOT. Taken together, results suggest that IMP, at least as measured by the TSIA, may not be as salient a component of the alexithymia construct as are the DIF, DDF, and EOT components. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Validation of the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS) in scrupulous and nonscrupulous patients: Revision of factor structure and psychometrics.
    Scrupulosity, or obsessive–compulsive symptoms related to religiosity or religion, is a common presentation of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and it is important to elucidate its phenomenology and measurement. Today, the most widespread questionnaire for the assessment of scrupulosity is the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS). The current study examines the psychometric properties of the PIOS in outpatient, treatment-seeking patients. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis suggested an unsatisfactory fit for previously suggested factor structures. A follow-up exploratory factor analysis suggested that a bifactor model was the most suitable solution. In addition, the scores of the PIOS and its revised subscales were found to have moderate-good concurrent validity; however, its scores discriminated poorly between patients with scrupulous obsessions and patients with OCD and other repugnant obsessions. Group differences and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses both indicated that the PIOS is more suitable in discriminating scrupulous obsessions in Christian patients but not in other religious groups (i.e., Jews, nonreligious patients). Additional analyses revealed that the co-occurrence of scrupulous and other repugnant obsessions is also moderated by religious affiliation. These results raise questions in terms of grouping scrupulosity with other repugnant obsessions and suggest for the need of culturally sensitive instruments of scrupulosity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Predicting recidivism with the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) in community-supervised male and female federal offenders.
    Higher order scores derived from the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS; Walters, 1995) have been found to predict recidivism in released prison inmates with effect sizes in the low-moderate to medium range. The current study sought to determine whether the PICTS is capable of predicting general recidivism in a sample of 81,881 male and 14,519 female offenders on federal probation or supervised release. Results indicated that the PICTS General Criminal Thinking, Proactive, and Reactive scores and 6 of the 7 thinking style scales predicted recidivism in follow-ups of 6 or more months, 12 or more months, and 24 or more months with effect sizes in the low-moderate to medium range. The effect sizes were reduced to small and low-moderate, respectively, when age and prior arrests were controlled for in a series of partial correlations. It was also noted that the PICTS General Criminal Thinking score contributed significant diagnostic information to recidivism prediction in both males and females above and beyond the information provided by a comprehensive risk assessment procedure. These results indicate that the PICTS may be a useful adjunct to other risk assessment procedures in providing comprehensive risk prediction and management services to offenders under community supervision. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Assessment of identity during adolescence using daily diary methods: Measurement invariance across time and sex.
    The aim of this study was to assess measurement invariance of adolescents’ daily reports on identity across time and sex. Adolescents (N = 497; mean age = 13.32 years at Time 1, 56.7% boys) from the general population reported on their identity commitments, exploration in depth and reconsideration on a daily basis for 3 weeks within 1 year across 5 years. We used the single-item version of the Utrecht Management of Identity Commitments Scale (UMICS; Klimstra et al., 2010), a broad measure of identity-formation processes covering both interpersonal and educational identity domains. This study tested configural, metric, scalar, and strict measurement invariance across days within weeks, across sex, across weeks within years, and across years. Results indicated that daily diary reports show strict measurement invariance across days, across weeks within years, across years, and across boys and girls. These results support the use of daily diary methods to assess identity at various time intervals ranging from days to years and across sex. Results are discussed with regard to future implications to study identity processes, both on smaller and larger time intervals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • "Assessment of identity during adolescence using daily diary methods: Measurement invariance across time and sex": Correction to Becht et al. (2015).
    Reports an error in "Assessment of Identity During Adolescence Using Daily Diary Methods: Measurement Invariance Across Time and Sex" by Andrik I. Becht, Susan J. T. Branje, Wilma A. M. Vollebergh, Dominique F. Maciejewski, Pol A. C. van Lier, Hans M. Koot, Jaap J. A. Denissen and Wim H. J. Meeus (Psychological Assessment, Advanced Online Publication, Aug 10, 2015, np). In the article the participants should have been reported as N = 494. No differences were found in the results upon reanalyzing the data with the correct number of participants. Additionally, the last sentence of the first full paragraph in the Invariance Across Boys and Girls subsection of the Method section should read “In the fourth model, strict invariance was examined, in which the residual variances were constrained to be equal for boys and girls.” (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-36246-001.) The aim of this study was to assess measurement invariance of adolescents’ daily reports on identity across time and sex. Adolescents (N = 497; mean age = 13.32 years at Time 1, 56.7% boys) from the general population reported on their identity commitments, exploration in depth and reconsideration on a daily basis for 3 weeks within 1 year across 5 years. We used the single-item version of the Utrecht Management of Identity Commitments Scale (UMICS; Klimstra et al., 2010), a broad measure of identity-formation processes covering both interpersonal and educational identity domains. This study tested configural, metric, scalar, and strict measurement invariance across days within weeks, across sex, across weeks within years, and across years. Results indicated that daily diary reports show strict measurement invariance across days, across weeks within years, across years, and across boys and girls. These results support the use of daily diary methods to assess identity at various time intervals ranging from days to years and across sex. Results are discussed with regard to future implications to study identity processes, both on smaller and larger time intervals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • What range of trait levels can the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) measure reliably? An item response theory analysis.
    It has previously been noted that inventories measuring traits that originated in a psychopathological paradigm can often reliably measure only a very narrow range of trait levels that are near and above clinical cutoffs. Much recent work has, however, suggested that autism spectrum disorder traits are on a continuum of severity that extends well into the nonclinical range. This implies a need for inventories that can capture individual differences in autistic traits from very high levels all the way to the opposite end of the continuum. The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) was developed based on a closely related rationale, but there has, to date, been no direct test of the range of trait levels that the AQ can reliably measure. To assess this, we fit a bifactor item response theory model to the AQ. Results suggested that AQ measures moderately low to moderately high levels of a general autistic trait with good measurement precision. The reliable range of measurement was significantly improved by scoring the instrument using its 4-point response scale, rather than dichotomizing responses. These results support the use of the AQ in nonclinical samples, but suggest that items measuring very low and very high levels of autistic traits would be beneficial additions to the inventory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The importance of assessing clinical phenomena in Mechanical Turk research.
    Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) website provides a data collection platform with quick and inexpensive access to diverse samples. Numerous reports have lauded MTurk as capturing high-quality data with an epidemiological sample that is more representative of the U.S. population than traditional in-person convenience samples (e.g., undergraduate subject pools). This benefit, in combination with the ease and low-cost of data collection, has led to a remarkable increase in studies using MTurk to investigate phenomena across a wide range of psychological disciplines. Multiple reports have now examined the demographic characteristics of MTurk samples. One key gap remains, however, in that relatively little is known about individual differences in clinical symptoms among MTurk participants. This paper discusses the importance of assessing clinical phenomena in MTurk samples and supports its assertions through an empirical investigation of a large sample (N = 1,098) of MTurk participants. Results revealed that MTurk participants endorse clinical symptoms to a substantially greater degree than traditional nonclinical samples. This distinction was most striking for depression and social anxiety symptoms, which were endorsed at levels comparable with individuals with clinically diagnosed mood and anxiety symptoms. Participants’ symptoms of physiological anxiety, hoarding, and eating pathology fell within the subclinical range. Overall, the number of individuals exceeding validated clinical cutoffs was between 3 and 19 times the estimated 12-month prevalence rates. Based on the current findings, it is argued that MTurk participants differ from the general population in meaningful ways, and researchers should consider this when referring to this sample as truly representative. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • An examination of the three components of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory: Profile comparisons and tests of moderation.
    There are a number of prominent trait-based models and assessments of psychopathy that posit the existence of a varying number of central traits, which differ in their relation to one another and the degree to which they manifest similar empirical networks. In the current study (N = 347), we examined Lilienfeld’s popular 3-factor model and measure (Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Short Form; Kastner, Sellbom, & Lilienfeld, 2012; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996) in relation to adverse developmental factors, self and informant ratings of general personality and “near neighbor” personality styles from the Dark Triad (e.g., narcissism), as well as internalizing symptoms and externalizing behaviors. The 3 factors—Fearless Dominance, Self-centered Impulsivity, and Coldheartedness—manifested relatively limited relations with one another (median r = .22) and demonstrated varying empirical networks such that Self-centered Impulsivity was associated with substantial maladaptivity, Fearless Dominance was associated with a mixture of adaptive and maladaptive correlates, and Coldheartedness’ relations to the external criteria fell in between and manifested a relatively small number of significant correlations. There was little evidence that the psychopathy factors in general, and Fearless Dominance more specifically, interacted with one another in the prediction of externalizing behaviors or interacted with adverse developmental/parental experiences to predict these behaviors. These results are relevant to ongoing discussions regarding the manner in which psychopathy is conceptualized and assessed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Assessment of adolescents’ victimization, aggression, and problem behaviors: Evaluation of the Problem Behavior Frequency Scale.
    This study evaluated the Problem Behavior Frequency Scale (PBFS), a self-report measure designed to assess adolescents’ frequency of victimization, aggression, and other problem behaviors. Analyses were conducted on a sample of 5,532 adolescents from 37 schools at 4 sites. About half (49%) of participants were male; 48% self-identified as Black non-Hispanic; 21% as Hispanic, 18% as White non-Hispanic. Adolescents completed the PBFS and measures of beliefs and values related to aggression, and delinquent peer associations at the start of the 6th grade and over 2 years later. Ratings of participants’ behavior were also obtained from teachers on the Behavioral Assessment System for Children. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a 7-factor model that differentiated among 3 forms of aggression (physical, verbal, and relational), 2 forms of victimization (overt and relational), drug use, and other delinquent behavior. Support was found for strong measurement invariance across gender, sites, and time. The PBFS factors generally showed the expected pattern of correlations with teacher ratings of adolescents’ behavior and self-report measures of relevant constructs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The development and validation of the Memory Support Rating Scale.
    Patient memory for treatment information is poor, and worse memory for treatment information is associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Memory support techniques have been harnessed to improve patient memory for treatment. However, a measure of memory support used by treatment providers during sessions has yet to be established. The present study reports on the development and psychometric properties of the Memory Support Rating Scale (MSRS)—an observer-rated scale designed to measure memory support. Adults with major depressive disorder (MDD; N = 42) were randomized to either cognitive therapy plus memory support (CT + MS; n = 22) or cognitive therapy as-usual (CT-as-usual; n = 20). At posttreatment, patients freely recalled treatment points via the patient recall task. Sessions (n = 171) were coded for memory support using the MSRS, 65% of which were also assessed for the quality of cognitive therapy via the Cognitive Therapy Rating Scale (CTRS). A unidimensional scale composed of 8 items was developed using exploratory factor analysis, though a larger sample is needed to further assess the factor structure of MSRS scores. High interrater and test–retest reliabilities of MSRS scores were observed across 7 MSRS coders. MSRS scores were higher in the CT + MS condition compared with CT-as-usual, demonstrating group differentiation ability. MSRS scores were positively associated with patient recall task scores but not associated with CTRS scores, demonstrating convergent and discriminant validity, respectively. Results indicate that the MSRS yields reliable and valid scores for measuring treatment providers’ use of memory support while delivering cognitive therapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Assessment of social traits in married couples: Self-reports versus spouse ratings around the interpersonal circumplex.
    Personality traits predict the quality of intimate relationships, and as a result can be useful additions to assessments of couple functioning. For traits involving social behavior, the affiliation (i.e., warmth, friendliness vs. hostility, quarrelsomeness) and control (i.e., dominance vs. deference, submissiveness) dimensions of the interpersonal circumplex (IPC) are an alternative to the 5-factor model traits of agreeableness and extraversion, given that they may provide a more specific and relevant description of social behavior in the context of couple functioning. The couple context creates an opportunity to supplement commonly used self-reports with informant ratings. Although substantial correlations between self-reports and partner ratings of personality are well-documented, differences between these assessment modalities in levels of affiliation and control have not been examined previously. The present study of 301 middle-aged and older couples addressed this issue by comparing self-reports and spouse ratings, using parallel forms of a measure of the interpersonal circumplex derived from the NEO (Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness) PI-R (Personality Inventory-Revised). Participants reported lower trait dominance relative to spouses’ ratings, and less trait hostility. For dominance, this discrepancy was evident at all levels of marital quality, but for hostility it was particularly apparent among couples reporting low marital quality. The tendency to self-report less dominance relative to ratings by spouses was stronger among women than men. These discrepancies may be important in couple assessment and intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Age and education corrected older adult normative data for a short form version of the Financial Capacity Instrument.
    Financial capacity is an instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) that comprises multiple abilities and is critical to independence and autonomy in older adults. Because of its cognitive complexity, financial capacity is often the first IADL to show decline in prodromal and clinical Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Despite its importance, few standardized assessment measures of financial capacity exist and there is little, if any, normative data available to evaluate financial skills in the elderly. The Financial Capacity Instrument-Short Form (FCI-SF) is a brief measure of financial skills designed to evaluate financial skills in older adults with cognitive impairment. In the current study, we present age- and education-adjusted normative data for FCI-SF variables in a sample of 1344 cognitively normal, community-dwelling older adults participating in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Individual FCI-SF raw scores were first converted to age-corrected scaled scores based on position within a cumulative frequency distribution and then grouped within 4 empirically supported and overlapping age ranges. These age-corrected scaled scores were then converted to age- and education-corrected scaled scores using the same methodology. This study has the potential to substantially enhance financial capacity evaluations of older adults through the introduction of age- and education-corrected normative data for the FCI-SF by allowing clinicians to: (a) compare an individual’s performance to that of a sample of similar age and education peers, (b) interpret various aspects of financial capacity relative to a normative sample, and (c) make comparisons between these aspects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Text mining a self-report back-translation.
    There are several recommendations about the routine to undertake when back translating self-report instruments in cross-cultural research. However, text mining methods have been generally ignored within this field. This work describes a text mining innovative application useful to adapt a personality questionnaire to 12 different languages. The method is divided in 3 different stages, a descriptive analysis of the available back-translated instrument versions, a dissimilarity assessment between the source language instrument and the 12 back-translations, and an item assessment of item meaning equivalence. The suggested method contributes to improve the back-translation process of self-report instruments for cross-cultural research in 2 significant intertwined ways. First, it defines a systematic approach to the back translation issue, allowing for a more orderly and informed evaluation concerning the equivalence of different versions of the same instrument in different languages. Second, it provides more accurate instrument back-translations, which has direct implications for the reliability and validity of the instrument’s test scores when used in different cultures/languages. In addition, this procedure can be extended to the back-translation of self-reports measuring psychological constructs in clinical assessment. Future research works could refine the suggested methodology and use additional available text mining tools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Does the Over-Claiming Questionnaire measure overclaiming? Absent convergent validity in a large community sample.
    The Over-Claiming Questionnaire (OCQ) aims to provide a practical and cost-effective method of assessing individual differences in the tendency to misrepresent oneself in self-reports. OCQ bias measures have strong theoretical appeal but limited empirical demonstrations of validity. Using a sample of 704 adult community members, we found minimal support for the OCQ as an assessment of misrepresentation. We assessed misrepresentation by comparing self-reports of personality and cognitive ability against other criterion indicators of these trait levels (peer reports of personality and performance on a cognitive ability measure). OCQ bias measures bore no relationship with either of these self-criterion discrepancy measures, and were also unassociated with self-deceptive enhancement scores. One OCQ index bore a modest relationship to narcissism. OCQ bias measures were instead consistently and sometimes even highly related to measures of careless responding. However, statistically controlling for careless responding only minimally improved the convergent validity of OCQ bias indices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The performance of the K6 scale in a large school sample: A follow-up study evaluating measurement invariance on the Idaho Youth Prevention Survey.
    Since 2013, Idaho has been building capacity and infrastructure through the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant to prevent substance abuse and related problems, namely psychiatric morbidity. As this federal initiative requires states to engage in data-driven strategic planning at the state and community levels, clinically validated instruments are particularly valuable in the context of school surveys that have limited space and require timely administration. Thus, the K6 scale was included on the 2014 Idaho Youth Prevention Survey as a measure of nonspecific psychological distress. To verify the unidimensional structure of the K6, principal axis and confirmatory factor analyses were performed in a school-based sample of Idaho students (n = 12,150). A series of multigroup confirmatory factor analyses were then performed to evaluate measurement invariance across gender, age, and race. Overall, the prevalence of serious psychological distress in the past 30 days was 17.2% in Idaho. Factor analyses confirmed the 1-factor solution of the K6. Four levels of measurement invariance were demonstrated across gender, age, and race. Together, these results further illustrate the construct validity of the K6 for use in adolescent populations. Other states are encouraged to include the K6 on their school surveys to facilitate policy planning and resource allocation as well as generate cross-state comparisons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • A comparison of a tablet version of the Quality of Life Systemic Inventory for Children (QLSI-C) to the standard paper version.
    Integration of e-Health technologies for purposes of both assessment and intervention has recently become an interest area in pediatric psychology. The purpose of this study is to present psychometric characteristics of a technology-based (i.e., tablet administration) approach for measuring quality of life (QOL) in children. Eighty children (8–12 years) completed the Quality of Life Systemic Inventory for Children (QLSI-C) twice over a 2-week delay, in a crossover design that used paper and tablet-based modes of administration. Equivalence of scores across methods was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), augmented by paired t test and Pearson’s correlations. Test–retest reliability was assessed using paired t test and Pearson’s correlations while internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s coefficient. Results showed a good concordance across methods of administration (ICCs = .72 to .91; r = .56 to .83). Paired t test showed no significant differences between the tablet and paper version of the QLSI-C. Internal consistency reliability yielded acceptable Cronbach’s alphas for all QLSI-C scores, with all α > .70. Test–retest reliability for the tablet-administered QLSI-C was good (r = .66 to .90). Paired t test showed no significant difference between Time 1 and 2 for the QLSI-C scores, except for the state score. Findings established the reliability of the tablet-administered QLSI-C scores. This technology approach to assessment is more attractive for children, decreases time for administration, and enhances the ease of scoring. These advantages might encourage both clinicians and researchers to consider using e-Health developments in assessment in pediatric psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The Chinese version of the 8-item Committed Action Questionnaire (ChCAQ-8): A preliminary analysis of the factorial and criterion validity.
    Committed action is a key component of the psychological flexibility model that recently has been applied in chronic pain settings. Developed within the Western context, the 8-item Committed Action Questionnaire (CAQ-8) demonstrated good psychometric properties. This study aimed to translate the original English version of the CAQ-8 into Chinese (ChCAQ-8) and to assess its reliability, factor structure and concurrent criterion validity. A total of 210 Chinese patients with chronic pain completed the ChCAQ-8, the Chronic Pain Grade, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results of confirmatory factor analysis showed both the 2-factor correlated (CFI = .99) and hierarchical (CFI = .98) models met the minimum acceptable fit criterion. The 2 subscales and the entire scale of ChCAQ-8 demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach’s αs ranging .70–.86). The ChCAQ-8 negative subscale score was significantly correlated with pain intensity, disability, pain catastrophizing, and depression in the expected direction. The ChCAQ-8 positive subscale was significantly correlated with pain castastrophizing and depression. Results of multivariate regression modeling showed the ChCAQ-8 negative subscale predicted depression (std β = .19, p <.01) and disability (std β = .14, p <.05), after adjusting for pain intensity, pain duration and pain catastrophizing. Our findings offer preliminary data for the reliability, factorial and concurrent criterion validity of the ChCAQ-8 in the Chinese population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • A Catalan adaptation and validation of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children.
    Pain catastrophizing is a key factor in modern conceptualizations of pain. The development of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children (PCS-C) has greatly contributed to the interest shown by pediatric pain specialists. The purpose of this work was to study the factor structure of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and analyze its reliability and convergent, discriminant, and criteria related validity. Three hundred sixteen adolescents (12–19 years) completed the Catalan version of the PCS-C and provided information about pain intensity. A subgroup of 136 participants also completed measures of disability, anxiety sensitivity and pain coping strategies. The results confirmed the 3-factor model solution for the PCS-C, and demonstrated good internal consistency for the total Catastrophizing Scale (0.89) and for the Rumination (0.80) and Helplessness (0.82) PCS-C subscales. Internal consistency for the Magnification subscale, however, was not quite as good (0.63). This 3-factor model could be improved by removing Item 8 and developing additional items for the Rumination PCS-C subscale. The results also provide evidence of the convergent, discriminant and criterion-related validity of the PCS-C scores when used with Catalan-speaking adolescents. Our data demonstrate that the Catalan version of the PCS-C is a psychometrically sound questionnaire that provides valid and reliable scores when used to assess pain catastrophizing in adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source



Back to top


Back to top