PsyResearch
ψ   Psychology Research on the Web   



Couples needed for online psychology research


Help us grow:




If you are in NYC and looking for a psychologist, consider NYC Psychological Services.

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology - Vol 82, Iss 4

Random Abstract
Quick Journal Finder:
Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology publishes original contributions on the following topics: (a) the development, validity, and use of techniques of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disordered behavior; (b) studies of populations of clinical interest, such as hospital patients, individuals who have experienced physical or psychological stressors, adolescents, children, and similar samples; (c) cross-cultural and demographic studies of interest for behavior disorders; (d) studies of personality where these have a clear bearing on problems of clinical dysfunction; (e) studies of gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation that have a clear bearing on diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and prevention.
Copyright 2014 American Psychological Association
  • Cognitive processing therapy for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder: A comparison between outpatient and residential treatment.
    Objective: Across the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, outpatient and residential posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment programs are available to veterans of all ages and both genders; however, no research to date has compared these treatment options. This study compared veterans who received outpatient (n = 514) to those who received residential treatment (n = 478) within a VA specialty clinic on demographic and pretreatment symptom variables. Further, the study examined pre- to posttreatment symptom trajectories across the treatment programs. Method: All 992 veterans met diagnostic criteria for PTSD and attended at least 1 session of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) in either the outpatient or residential program. Bivariate analyses were utilized to investigate differences between samples on demographic variables and severity of pretreatment symptoms. Multilevel modeling (MLM) was used to investigate the change in symptomatology between the 2 samples from pre- to posttreatment. Results: Analyses indicated that the samples differed on all demographic and pretreatment symptom variables, with residential patients reporting higher scores on all assessment measures. MLM results demonstrated that symptom scores improved for all veterans across time, with outpatients consistently reporting fewer symptoms at both time points. The time by program interaction was significant for PTSD-related symptom trajectories, but not for the depression-related symptom trajectory. Conclusion: This is the 1st study to compare pretreatment characteristics and treatment outcome between veterans receiving outpatient and residential PTSD treatment. Findings may help clinicians select appropriate care for their patients by identifying relevant pretreatment characteristics and generally informing expectations of treatment outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Randomized controlled trial of two brief alcohol interventions for OEF/OIF veterans.
    Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of 2 brief interventions for alcohol misuse in a sample of combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Method: Participants were 68 combat veterans (91.2% male; 64.7% White, 27.9% Black) with a mean age of 32.31 years (SD = 8.84) who screened positive for hazardous drinking in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center primary care clinic using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (Babor, Higgins-Biddle, Saunders, & Monteiro, 2001). More than half of the sample (57.4%) met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; based on the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale; Blake et al., 1995). Eligible veterans who elected to participate completed a baseline assessment and were randomized to receive 1 of 2 interventions (personalized feedback delivered with or without a motivational interviewing counseling session). Both interventions included information on hazardous drinking, PTSD symptoms, depression, and coping. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 6 weeks and 6 months post-intervention. Results: Both conditions resulted in statistically significant reductions in quantity and frequency of alcohol use as well as frequency of binge drinking and alcohol-related consequences. Within-group effect sizes (ds) were in the small to medium range (.21–.55) for quantity and frequency of alcohol use. There were no statistically significant Condition × Time interactions, suggesting that both interventions were similarly effective. PTSD and non-PTSD veterans responded equally well to both interventions, but veterans with PTSD assigned to feedback plus motivational interviewing reported greater reductions in weekly drinking at the 6-week follow-up. Conclusions: These findings suggest that brief interventions for alcohol misuse may be effective for reducing drinking, even in an Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran population with a high degree of PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • PTSD diagnostic validity in Veterans Affairs electronic records of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.
    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 82(4) of Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (see record 2014-29889-001). The sentence in the 7th paragraph of the Results section “False negatives had significantly lower IPF scores (OR 0.79; 95% CI [0.64, 0.97] per one-unit increase in grand mean score), fewer Cluster C symptoms (OR 0.69; 95% CI [0.62, 0.77]), and a higher number of Cluster D symptoms (OR 1.34; 95% CI [1.14, 1.58]) for lifetime PTSD, compared with true positives and negatives.” should read “False positives had significantly lower IPF scores . . . ”] Objective: Administrative planning and policy decisions frequently rely on diagnostic data extracted from large electronic databases. However, the accuracy of this diagnostic information is uncertain. The present study examined the degree to which various diagnoses of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic databases were concordant with PTSD diagnostic status determined by standardized diagnostic interview. Method: We interviewed 1,649 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars using the PTSD Module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–IV (SCID). Participants also completed other interview-based and self-report measures of psychopathology and provided consent to access their electronic medical records (EMRs). Results: Concordance between database diagnosis and SCID diagnosis was 72.3% for current PTSD and 79.4% for lifetime PTSD. We observed associations between concordance status and combat exposure, PTSD symptom presentation, comorbid anxiety and depression, and psychosocial impairment. Veterans with false-negative PTSD diagnoses in the EMR were more likely to report lower levels of combat exposure, panic, and PTSD avoidance symptoms. Veterans with false-positive PTSD diagnoses in the EMR were more likely to report treatment seeking for emotional problems and less overall functional impairment. Conclusions: Although the majority of participants were concordant for PTSD status, over 25% of EMR diagnoses differed from those obtained in the diagnostic interview, with varying proportions of false positives and false negatives. Overall, those individuals with the most and least severe symptom presentations in the diagnostic interview were more likely to be accurately classified. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Correction to Holowka et al. (2014).
    Reports an error in "PTSD diagnostic validity in veterans affairs electronic records of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans" by Darren W. Holowka, Brian P. Marx, Margaret A. Gates, Heather J. Litman, Gayatri Ranganathan, Raymond C. Rosen and Terence M. Keane (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Apr 14, 2014, np). The sentence in the 7th paragraph of the Results section “False negatives had significantly lower IPF scores (OR 0.79; 95% CI [0.64, 0.97] per one-unit increase in grand mean score), fewer Cluster C symptoms (OR 0.69; 95% CI [0.62, 0.77]), and a higher number of Cluster D symptoms (OR 1.34; 95% CI [1.14, 1.58]) for lifetime PTSD, compared with true positives and negatives.” should read “False positives had significantly lower IPF scores . . . ” (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-12886-001.) Objective: Administrative planning and policy decisions frequently rely on diagnostic data extracted from large electronic databases. However, the accuracy of this diagnostic information is uncertain. The present study examined the degree to which various diagnoses of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic databases were concordant with PTSD diagnostic status determined by standardized diagnostic interview. Method: We interviewed 1,649 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars using the PTSD Module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–IV (SCID). Participants also completed other interview-based and self-report measures of psychopathology and provided consent to access their electronic medical records (EMRs). Results: Concordance between database diagnosis and SCID diagnosis was 72.3% for current PTSD and 79.4% for lifetime PTSD. We observed associations between concordance status and combat exposure, PTSD symptom presentation, comorbid anxiety and depression, and psychosocial impairment. Veterans with false-negative PTSD diagnoses in the EMR were more likely to report lower levels of combat exposure, panic, and PTSD avoidance symptoms. Veterans with false-positive PTSD diagnoses in the EMR were more likely to report treatment seeking for emotional problems and less overall functional impairment. Conclusions: Although the majority of participants were concordant for PTSD status, over 25% of EMR diagnoses differed from those obtained in the diagnostic interview, with varying proportions of false positives and false negatives. Overall, those individuals with the most and least severe symptom presentations in the diagnostic interview were more likely to be accurately classified. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Enhancement of couples’ communication and dyadic coping by a self-directed approach: A randomized controlled trial.
    Although prevention of relationship distress and dissolution has potential to strengthen the well-being of partners and any children they are raising, dissemination of prevention programs can be limited because couples face many barriers to in-person participation. An alternative strategy, providing couples with an instructional DVD, is tested in the present study, in which 330 Caucasian couples (N = 660 participants; mean age: men 41.4 years, women 40.0 years) were randomly assigned to a DVD group without any further support, a DVD group with technical telephone coaching, or a wait-list control group. Couples completed questionnaires at pretest, posttest, and 3 and 6 months after completion of the intervention. Self-report measures of dyadic coping, communication quality, ineffective arguing, and relationship satisfaction were used to test whether the intervention groups improved in comparison with the control group. Women in both intervention groups increased in dyadic coping, reduced conflict behavior, and were more satisfied with their relationship 6 months after the intervention. Effects for men were mixed. Participants with poorer skills reported stronger improvement. Intimate relationships can, within limits, be positively influenced by a self-directed approach. Effective dissemination of principles underlying successful relationships can be facilitated through the use of emerging low-cost tools and technologies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The Marriage Checkup: A randomized controlled trial of annual relationship health checkups.
    Objective: This study assessed the efficacy of the Marriage Checkup (MC) for improving relationship health and intimacy. Method: Cohabiting married couples (N = 215, Mage women = 44.5 years, men = 47 years, 93.1% Caucasian) recruited from a northeastern U.S. metropolitan area through print and electronic media were randomly assigned to MC treatment or wait-list control. Treatment but not control couples participated in assessment and feedback visits, at the beginning of the study and again 1 year later. All couples completed 9 sets of questionnaires over 2 years. Outcome measures included the Quality of Marriage Index, the Global Distress subscale of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory–Revised, the Intimate Safety Questionnaire, and the Relational Acceptance Questionnaire. Results: A latent growth curve model indicated significant between-group differences in intimacy at every measurement point after baseline (d ranged from .20 to .55, Md = .37), significant between-group differences in women’s felt acceptance for every measurement point after baseline (d ranged from .17 to .47, Md = .34), significant between-group differences in men’s felt acceptance through the 1-year 2-week follow-up (d across follow-up ranged from .11 to .40, Md = .25), and significant between-group differences in relationship distress through 1-year 6-month follow-up (d across follow-up ranged from .11 to .39, Md = .23). Conclusions: Longitudinal analysis of the MC supports the hypothesis that the MC significantly improves intimacy, acceptance, and satisfaction. Implications for dissemination are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The efficacy of case management with persons who have substance abuse problems: A three-level meta-analysis of outcomes.
    Objective: Case management has been widely used as an intervention in the treatment of substance abuse problems. Its effectiveness has been associated with over 450 outcomes, some consistent with case management’s traditional functions of linking (treatment tasks) and others typical of treatment outcomes such as substance use (personal functioning). Method: Meta-analyses were conducted on 21 randomized clinical trials in which we compared the efficacy of case management with standard-of-care conditions and active interventions. Characteristics of case management—including targeted outcomes, case management model, location on the treatment continuum, and intervention quality—were treated as moderators, as were 2 study features, length of follow-up, and methodological quality. Results: Results showed that case management was efficacious across all targeted outcomes when compared with standard of care (δ = 0.15, SE = 0.037), although the overall effect was weak. There was a significant difference, F(1, 429) = 25.26, p <.0001, between case management’s effect on treatment task outcomes such as linking with and staying in treatment (δ₂ = .29, p = .001) and improving individuals’ functioning of persons with substance abuse problems in areas such as substance use and HIV risk behaviors (δ₁ = 0.06, p = .05). Moderator analyses demonstrated that (a) 4 case management models were more effective than standard of care in improving treatment task outcomes and (b) case management was effective either in or out of treatment. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that case management is effective across a wide range of treatment task outcomes, but more limited in its effectiveness with personal functioning outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • What happens in treatment doesn’t stay in treatment: Cocaine abstinence during treatment is associated with fewer problems at follow-up.
    Objective: Cocaine users often present to treatment with a multitude of problems typically considered addiction related; however, there is little evidence that reductions in cocaine use are followed by reductions in these problems. This study evaluated the relationship between rates of cocaine use during treatment and the level of non-cocaine life problems experienced during a 12-month period following treatment in a pooled sample of 434 cocaine-dependent individuals participating in 1 of 5 randomized controlled trials. Method: Structural equation modeling and latent growth curve modeling were used to evaluate the relationship between frequency of cocaine use within treatment (8 or 12 weeks) and a latent construct of global problems indicated by the days of problems reported on the Addiction Severity Index across follow-up time points (1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment). Results: Both a continuous latent cocaine use outcome measure (percent days abstinent, percent positive urines, and maximum days of consecutive abstinence) and a dichotomous measure of cocaine use (≥21 consecutive days of abstinence) during the treatment period were associated with frequency of cocaine use and global problems during follow-up. Overall, results indicated that greater cocaine abstinence during the treatment period was associated with higher rates of abstinence and fewer global problems experienced following treatment. Conclusion: This is one of the first studies to support a model that suggests addiction-related problems decrease in accordance with achieving abstinence from cocaine, thereby providing evidence that within-treatment cocaine abstinence has benefits that extend beyond the frequency of drug use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Telephone-based problem-solving intervention for family caregivers of stroke survivors: A randomized controlled trial.
    Objective: Intervention trials for stroke caregivers after the early poststroke period are lacking. To address this gap, we examined the effectiveness of a problem-solving intervention (PSI) for stroke caregivers who provided care for at least 6 months and who experienced significant strain in their role. Method: One hundred twenty-two family caregivers (age = 66.2 years, 77.9% female) were randomly allocated to a PSI or control group. The PSI was composed of 2 home visits and 18 telephone calls delivered over a 3-month intensive intervention and a 9-month maintenance period. PSI and control groups received monthly information letters in addition to usual care. Primary caregiver outcomes were depressive symptoms (measure: Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression Scale) and sense of competence (measure: Sense of Competence Questionnaire). Results: In covariance analyses, caregivers of the PSI group showed significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms after 3 months (p <.01, d = −.48) and after 12 months (p <.05, d = −.37), but no better sense of competence compared with the control group. Latent growth curve analyses revealed positive significant (p <.05) linear and quadratic effects of PSI on both primary outcomes. No effects, however, were found on caregiver social-problem-solving abilities. Conclusions: Although beneficial effects were observed among caregivers in the PSI group, the lack of effects on problem-solving abilities implies other characteristics of the intervention might account for these benefits. The relative intensity and therapeutic contact during the first 3 months of the intervention may be particularly helpful to caregivers of stroke survivors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The effects of written emotional disclosure and coping skills training in rheumatoid arthritis: A randomized clinical trial.
    Objective: Two psychological interventions for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cognitive-behavioral coping skills training (CST) and written emotional disclosure (WED). These approaches have developed independently, and their combination may be more effective than either one alone. Furthermore, most studies of each intervention have methodological limitations, and each needs further testing. Method: We randomized 264 adults with RA in a 2 × 2 factorial design to 1 of 2 writing conditions (WED vs. control writing) followed by 1 of 2 training conditions (CST vs. arthritis education control training). Patient-reported pain and functioning, blinded evaluations of disease activity and walking speed, and an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein) were assessed at baseline and 1-, 4-, and 12-month follow-ups. Results: Completion of each intervention was high (>90% of patients), and attrition was low (10.2% at 12-month follow-up). Hierarchical linear modeling of treatment effects over the follow-up period, and analyses of covariance at each assessment point, revealed no interactions between writing and training; however, both interventions had main effects on outcomes, with small effect sizes. Compared with control training, CST decreased pain and psychological symptoms through 12 months. The effects of WED were mixed: Compared with control writing, WED reduced disease activity and physical disability at 1 month only, but WED had more pain than control writing on 1 of 2 measures at 4 and 12 months. Conclusions: The combination of WED and CST does not improve outcomes, perhaps because each intervention has unique effects at different time points. CST improves health status in RA and is recommended for patients, whereas WED has limited benefits and needs strengthening or better targeting to appropriate patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • A behavioral economic analysis of changes in food-related and food-free reinforcement during weight loss treatment.
    Objective: Behavioral economic theory predicts that reductions in consumption of highly valued commodities, such as drugs or palatable food items, are facilitated by increasing engagement in reinforcing substitutes. The current study prospectively examines changes in engagement in and enjoyment of food versus food-free activities during an 18-month behavioral weight loss intervention. Method: Participants were 202 overweight/obese individuals who took part in an 18-month behavioral weight loss treatment and were randomly assigned to a traditional hypocaloric, low-fat diet condition or a traditional hypocaloric, low-fat diet plus a goal to limit variety in snack food consumption condition. At baseline and 6, 12, and 18 months, participants were weighed and completed a measure that assessed recent frequency of engagement in and enjoyment of a variety of both food and food-free activities. Results: Growth models revealed a statistically significant decrease in the relative percentage of food-related reinforcement (vs. food-free) over time (reinforcement ratio, or RR), with the greatest reduction during the first 6 months of treatment. Food-related reinforcement decreased over time, and food-free reinforcement increased. Additionally, the RR change predicted change in body mass index (BMI) from 0 to 6 months and 0 to 18 months, such that greater changes in RR were associated with greater changes in BMI. Conclusions: Findings suggest that behavioral weight loss treatment may promote a shift away from food-related reinforcement toward food-free reinforcement and that this change may predict BMI change. Future interventions may consider targeting increasing engagement in enjoyable food-free activities to help with long-term maintenance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Comparative efficacy of behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia: A randomized controlled trial.
    Objective: To examine the unique contribution of behavior therapy (BT) and cognitive therapy (CT) relative to the full cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for persistent insomnia. Method: Participants were 188 adults (117 women; M age = 47.4 years, SD = 12.6) with persistent insomnia (average of 14.5 years duration). They were randomized to 8 weekly, individual sessions consisting of BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). Results: Full CBT was associated with greatest improvements, the improvements associated with BT were faster but not as sustained and the improvements associated with CT were slower and sustained. The proportion of treatment responders was significantly higher in the CBT (67.3%) and BT (67.4%) relative to CT (42.4%) groups at post treatment, while 6 months later CT made significant further gains (62.3%), BT had significant loss (44.4%), and CBT retained its initial response (67.6%). Remission rates followed a similar trajectory, with higher remission rates at post treatment in CBT (57.3%) relative to CT (30.8%), with BT falling in between (39.4%); CT made further gains from post treatment to follow up (30.9% to 51.6%). All 3 therapies produced improvements of daytime functioning at both post treatment and follow up, with few differential changes across groups. Conclusions: Full CBT is the treatment of choice. Both BT and CT are effective, with a more rapid effect for BT and a delayed action for CT. These different trajectories of changes provide unique insights into the process of behavior change via behavioral versus cognitive routes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Juvenile justice girls’ depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation 9 years after multidimensional treatment foster care.
    Objective: Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) has been found to reduce delinquency among girls in juvenile justice through 2-year follow-up. Given that such girls are at elevated risk for suicide and depression into adulthood, we tested MTFC effects on long-term trajectories of suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms. Method: Girls (N = 166; mean [SD] age = 15.3 [1.2] years; 68% White) with a recent criminal referral who were mandated to out-of-home care were enrolled in 2 sequential cohorts. Girls were randomized to receive MTFC (n = 81) or group care (GC) treatment as usual (TAU; n = 85); the second MTFC cohort also received modules targeting substance use and risky sexual behavior. Depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation were assessed repeatedly through early adulthood (mean [SD] follow-up = 8.8 [2.9] years). Suicide attempt history was assessed in early adulthood. Results: Girls assigned to MTFC showed significantly greater decreases in depressive symptoms across the long-term follow-up than GC girls (π = −.86, p <.05). Decreases in suicidal ideation rates were slightly stronger in MTFC than in GC as indicated by a marginal main effect (odds ratio [OR] = .92, p <.10) and a significant interaction that favored MTFC in the second cohort relative to the first (OR = .88, p <.01). There were no significant MTFC effects on suicide attempt. Conclusions: MTFC decreased depressive symptoms and suicidal thinking beyond the decreases attributable to time and TAU. Thus, MTFC has further impact on girls’ lives than originally anticipated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • The economic impact of multisystemic therapy through midlife: A cost–benefit analysis with serious juvenile offenders and their siblings.
    Objective: This study investigated the economic benefits of multisystemic therapy (MST) versus individual therapy (IT) using arrest data from 176 serious juvenile offenders and 129 of their closest-in-age siblings who participated, on average, 25 years earlier in a randomized clinical trial (Borduin et al., 1995). Method: Two types of benefits of MST were evaluated: (a) The value to taxpayers was derived from measures of criminal justice system expenses (e.g., police and sheriffs’ offices, court processing, community supervision), and (b) the value to crime victims was derived from measures of both tangible (e.g., property damage and loss, health care, lost productivity) and intangible (e.g., pain, suffering, reduced quality of life) losses. Results: Reductions in criminality in the MST versus IT conditions were associated with lasting benefits to both taxpayers and crime victims, with cumulative benefits of MST estimated at $35,582 per juvenile offender and $7,798 per sibling. Overall, every dollar spent on MST recovered $5.04 in savings to taxpayers and crime victims in the 25 years following treatment. Conclusions: This study represents the most comprehensive cost–benefit analysis of an MST clinical trial to date and demonstrates that an evidence-based treatment such as MST can produce modest economic benefits well into adulthood. Implications of the authors’ findings for policymakers and public service agencies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • A controlled evaluation of family behavior therapy in concurrent child neglect and drug abuse.
    Objective: Approximately 50% of child protective service (CPS) referrals abuse drugs; yet, existing treatment studies in this population have been limited to case examinations. Therefore, a family-based behavioral therapy was evaluated in mothers referred from CPS for child neglect and drug abuse utilizing a controlled experimental design. Method: Seventy-two mothers evidencing drug abuse or dependence and child neglect were randomly assigned to family behavior therapy (FBT) or treatment as usual (TAU). Participants were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 10 months postrandomization. Results: As hypothesized, intent-to-treat repeated measures analyses revealed mothers referred for child neglect not due to their children being exposed to illicit drugs demonstrated better outcomes in child maltreatment potential from baseline to 6- and 10-month postrandomization assessments when assigned to FBT, as compared with TAU mothers and FBT mothers who were referred due to child drug exposure. Similar results occurred for hard drug use from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. However, TAU mothers referred due to child drug exposure were also found to decrease their hard drug use more than TAU mothers of non-drug-exposed children and FBT mothers of drug-exposed children at 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Although effect sizes for mothers assigned to FBT were slightly larger for marijuana use than TAU (medium vs. large), these differences were not statistically significant. Specific to secondary outcomes, mothers in FBT, relative to TAU, increased time employed from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Mothers in FBT, compared to TAU, also decreased HIV risk from baseline to 6 months postrandomization. There were no differences in outcome between FBT and TAU for number of days children were in CPS custody and alcohol intoxication, although FBT mothers demonstrated marginal decreases (p = .058) in incarceration from baseline to 6 months postrandomization relative to TAU mothers. Conclusion: Family-based behavioral treatment programs offer promise in mothers who have been reported to CPS for concurrent substance abuse and child neglect of their children. However, continued intervention development in this population is very much needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Changes in emotion regulation in adults with and without a history of childhood abuse following posttraumatic stress disorder treatment.
    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 82(4) of Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (see record 2014-29889-002). The last two sentences in the abstract should have been: “These findings cast doubt on the assumption that CA is associated with worse emotion regulation following PTSD treatment, arguing against assertions that a history of CA itself is a contraindication for traditional PTSD treatment, and that there is a clear necessity for additional interventions designed at targeting assumed emotion regulation deficits.” All versions of this article have been corrected.] Objective: This study compared changes in emotion regulation and trait affect over the course of PTSD treatment with either prolonged exposure (PE) therapy or sertraline in adults with and without a history of childhood abuse (CA). Method: Two hundred adults with PTSD received 10 weeks of PE or sertraline. Emotion regulation and trait affect were assessed pre- and posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (Gross & John, 2003), the Negative Mood Regulation Scale (Catanzaro & Mearns, 1990), and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). Results: Individuals with and without a history of CA did not differ from one another at pretreatment on PTSD severity, emotion regulation, or positive/negative affect. In addition, treatment was effective at improving emotion regulation and trait affect in those with and without a history of CA, and no significant differences in emotion regulation or trait affect emerged posttreatment or at 6-month follow-up between adults with and without a history of CA. Furthermore, noninferiority analyses indicated that the emotion regulation and trait affect outcomes of individuals with a history of CA were no worse than those of individuals without a history of CA. Conclusion: These findings cast doubt on the assumption that CA is associated with worse emotion regulation following PTSD treatment, arguing against assertions that a history of CA itself is a contraindication for traditional PTSD treatment. There is a clear necessity for additional interventions designed to target assumed emotion regulation deficits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Correction to Jerud et al. (2014).
    Reports an error in "Changes in emotion regulation in adults with and without a history of childhood abuse following posttraumatic stress disorder treatment" by Alissa B. Jerud, Lori A. Zoellner, Larry D. Pruitt and Norah C. Feeny (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Apr 7, 2014, np). The last two sentences in the abstract should have been: “These findings cast doubt on the assumption that CA is associated with worse emotion regulation following PTSD treatment, arguing against assertions that a history of CA itself is a contraindication for traditional PTSD treatment, and that there is a clear necessity for additional interventions designed at targeting assumed emotion regulation deficits.” All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-12068-001.) Objective: This study compared changes in emotion regulation and trait affect over the course of PTSD treatment with either prolonged exposure (PE) therapy or sertraline in adults with and without a history of childhood abuse (CA). Method: Two hundred adults with PTSD received 10 weeks of PE or sertraline. Emotion regulation and trait affect were assessed pre- and posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (Gross & John, 2003), the Negative Mood Regulation Scale (Catanzaro & Mearns, 1990), and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). Results: Individuals with and without a history of CA did not differ from one another at pretreatment on PTSD severity, emotion regulation, or positive/negative affect. In addition, treatment was effective at improving emotion regulation and trait affect in those with and without a history of CA, and no significant differences in emotion regulation or trait affect emerged posttreatment or at 6-month follow-up between adults with and without a history of CA. Furthermore, noninferiority analyses indicated that the emotion regulation and trait affect outcomes of individuals with a history of CA were no worse than those of individuals without a history of CA. Conclusion: These findings cast doubt on the assumption that CA is associated with worse emotion regulation following PTSD treatment, arguing against assertions that a history of CA itself is a contraindication for traditional PTSD treatment. There is a clear necessity for additional interventions designed to target assumed emotion regulation deficits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source

  • Benchmarking outcomes in a public behavioral health setting: Feedback as a quality improvement strategy.
    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a large public behavioral health (PBH) agency serving only clients at or below the federal poverty level that had implemented continuous outcome feedback as a quality improvement strategy. Method: The authors investigated the post treatment outcomes of 5,168 individuals seeking treatment for a broad range of diagnoses who completed at least 2 psychotherapy sessions. The Outcome Rating Scale (ORS; Duncan, 2011; Miller & Duncan, 2004) was used to measure outcomes. Clients had a mean age of 36.7 years and were predominantly female (60.7%) and White (67.8%), with 17.7% being Hispanic, 9.3% being African American, and 2.8% being Native American. Forty-six percent were diagnosed with depression, mood, and anxiety disorders; 18.8% were diagnosed with substance abuse disorders; and 14.4% were diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A subset of clients with a primary diagnosis of a depressive disorder was compared to treatment efficacy benchmarks derived from clinical trials of major depression. Given that the PBH agency had also implemented an outcome management system, the total sample was also compared to benchmarks derived from clinical trials of continuous outcome feedback. Results: Treatment effect sizes of psychotherapy delivered at the PBH agency were comparable to effect size estimates of clinical trials of depression and feedback. Observed effect sizes were smaller, however, when compared to feedback benchmarks that used the ORS. Conclusions: Services to the poor and disabled can be effective, and continuous outcome feedback may be a viable means both to improve outcomes and to narrow the gap between research and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
    Citation link to source



Back to top


Back to top