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Journal of Occupational Health Psychology - Vol 20, Iss 3

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Journal of Occupational Health Psychology The Journal of Occupational Health Psychology publishes research, theory, and public policy articles in occupational health psychology, an interdisciplinary field representing a broad range of backgrounds, interests, and specializations. Occupational health psychology concerns the application of psychology to improving the quality of worklife and to protecting and promoting the safety, health, and well-being of workers. The Journal has a threefold focus on the work environment, the individual and the work family interface.
Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association
  • The meaning and measurement of work fatigue: Development and evaluation of the Three-Dimensional Work Fatigue Inventory (3D-WFI).
    Although work fatigue represents an important construct in several substantive areas, prior conceptual definitions and measures have been inadequate in a number of ways. The goals of the present study were to develop a conceptual definition and outline the desirable characteristics of a work fatigue measure, briefly examine several prior measures of work fatigue-related constructs, and develop and evaluate a new measure of work fatigue. The Three-Dimensional Work Fatigue Inventory (3D-WFI) provides separate and commensurate assessments of physical, mental, and emotional work fatigue. Results from a pilot study (n = 207) and a broader evaluative study of U.S. wage and salary workers (n = 2,477) suggest that the 3D-WFI is psychometrically sound and evinces a meaningful pattern of relations with variables that comprise the nomological network of work fatigue. As with all new measures, additional research is required to evaluate fully the utility of the 3D-WFI in research on work fatigue. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Stressful work environment and wellbeing: What comes first?
    The association between the psychosocial work environment, including job demands, job control, and organizational justice, and employee wellbeing has been well established. However, the exposure to adverse work environments is typically measured only using self-reported measures that are vulnerable to reporting bias, and thus any associations found may be explained by reverse causality. Using linear regression models and cross-lagged structural equation modeling (SEM), we tested the direction of the association between established job stress models (job demand control and organizational justice models) and 3 wellbeing indicators (psychological distress, sleeping problems, and job satisfaction) among 1524 physicians in a 4-year follow-up. Results from the longitudinal cross-lagged analyses showed that the direction of the association was from low justice to decreasing wellbeing rather than the reverse. Although the pattern was similar in job demands and job control, a reciprocal association was found between job control and psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Lagged effects of family-supportive organization perceptions and supervision in relation to generalized work-related resources.
    In the present study, grounded in organizational support and social exchange theory, the dynamic lagged interplay between family supportive supervision (FSS), family supportive organization perceptions (FSOP), perceived organizational support (POS), and leader–member exchange (LMX) was examined. Data were collected from 435 respondents over 3 time points with 6-week lags between assessments. Consistent with theory, FSS had a significant lagged effect on FSOP, whereas the reverse relationship was not supported. Interestingly, contrary to conservation of resources theory, we did not find significant lagged effects between POS and FSOP. Results further indicated that LMX and FSS were reciprocally related over time, suggesting the potential for a dynamic, mutually beneficial exchange relationship between subordinates and supervisors. Theoretical implications and considerations for research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Workplace surface acting and marital partner discontent: Anxiety and exhaustion spillover mechanisms.
    Surface acting (i.e., faking and suppressing emotions at work) is repeatedly linked to employee negative moods and emotional exhaustion, but the consequences may also go beyond work boundaries. We provide a unique theoretical integration of these 2 emotional labor consequences with 2 work-to-family conflict mechanisms, mood spillover and resource drain, to explain why surface acting is likely to create marital partner discontent (i.e., partner’s perceived work-to-family conflict and desire for the employee to quit). A survey of 197 hotel managers and their marital partners supported that managers’ surface acting was directly related to their partner wanting them to quit, and indirectly to partner’s perception of work-to-family conflict via exhaustion consistent with the resource drain mechanism. Anxiety from surface acting had an indirect mediating effect on marital partner discontent through exhaustion. Importantly, controlling for dispositional negativity and job demands did not weaken these effects. Implications for theory and future research integrating work–family and emotional labor are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into nonwork: A daily diary study.
    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 20(3) of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (see record 2015-15847-001). There was a misspelling in the figures. The legends for Figure 1 and Figure 2 should read “High Daily Resilience”.] This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work–task and relationship conflict–spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis. We hypothesized that daily personal resources can buffer the daily negative spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into the nonwork domain. A total of 113 employees (n = 565 occasions) filled in a daily diary questionnaire in the evening before bedtime over 5 consecutive working days. Results of multilevel analysis showed that the presence of daily personal resources is essential to buffer the spillover of interpersonal conflict at work to the nonwork domain. Specifically, on days that employees were not very optimistic or resilient, interpersonal conflicts resulted in higher strain-based work–life conflict experiences. These findings contribute to the JD-R theory and show how the unfavorable effects of daily interpersonal conflicts in the work domain may be avoided in the nonwork domain through enhancing personal resources. We discuss the implications for theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • An assessment of the overlap between morale and work engagement in a nonoperational military sample.
    The degree of overlap between two positive motivational constructs—morale and work engagement—was assessed in a random sample of Canadian Armed Forces personnel stationed across Canada (N = 1,224). Based on self-determination theory and past research, job-specific self-efficacy, trust in teammates, and job significance were expected to be associated with morale and work engagement. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that morale and work engagement were highly positively correlated, but had different patterns of association with predictor and outcome variables. Although trust in teammates and job significance predicted both morale and work engagement, job-specific self-efficacy predicted morale but not work engagement. Willingness to deploy on operations, turnover intentions, and psychological distress were predicted by both morale and work engagement, but morale was a better predictor of psychological distress and work engagement was a stronger predictor of turnover intentions. Together, the results suggest that, despite their overlap, morale and work engagement, as defined and measured herein, are not interchangeable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Correction to Martinez-Corts et al. (2015).
    Reports an error in "Spillover of Interpersonal Conflicts From Work into Nonwork: A Daily Diary Study" by Inés Martinez-Corts, Evangelia Demerouti, Arnold B. Bakker and Marina Boz (Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Jan 19, 2015, np). There was a misspelling in the figures. The legends for Figure 1 and Figure 2 should read “High Daily Resilience”. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-00988-001.) This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work–task and relationship conflict–spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis. We hypothesized that daily personal resources can buffer the daily negative spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into the nonwork domain. A total of 113 employees (n = 565 occasions) filled in a daily diary questionnaire in the evening before bedtime over 5 consecutive working days. Results of multilevel analysis showed that the presence of daily personal resources is essential to buffer the spillover of interpersonal conflict at work to the nonwork domain. Specifically, on days that employees were not very optimistic or resilient, interpersonal conflicts resulted in higher strain-based work–life conflict experiences. These findings contribute to the JD-R theory and show how the unfavorable effects of daily interpersonal conflicts in the work domain may be avoided in the nonwork domain through enhancing personal resources. We discuss the implications for theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Coping styles moderate the relationships between exposure to community violence and work-related outcomes.
    The purpose of this study was to identify coping strategies used by employees exposed to community violence and their relationships to work-related outcomes. In study 1, Mexican Maquiladora employees who experienced community violence reported their coping strategies. Results identified 3 strategies: social, solitary, and maladaptive coping. In study 2, another sample completed measures of violence exposure, strain, coping, and turnover intention. Supervisors provided performance evaluations. Community violence predicted the use of all 3 strategies. Social coping lessened the effects of community violence on turnover while maladaptive strategies predicted increased psychological strain. Results indicate that workers use a variety of coping strategies in response to community violence that both lessen and magnify the effects of violence exposure and impact their psychological strain, turnover intention, and job performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • When confidence comes and goes: How variation in self-efficacy moderates stressor–strain relationships.
    Inconsistent published findings regarding a proposed buffering role of self-efficacy in stress coping led us to develop a model in which within-person variability in self-efficacy over time affects how individuals’ mean levels of self-efficacy moderate the relationship between demands and psychological symptoms. Results from two independent samples (manufacturing workers and college students) supported the hypothesized interaction between demands, self-efficacy mean level, and self-efficacy variability. Demands were more positively associated with psychological strain among those with high and stable self-efficacy than those with high and variable self-efficacy. We discuss the implications of intrapersonal variability in self-efficacy for research on stress coping. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Need satisfaction and employees’ recovery state at work: A daily diary study.
    The present study aimed to advance insight in the associations between employees’ daily effort expenditure at work and their recovery state during the workday, and specifically focused on the role of daily work-related need satisfaction in this process. We examined (a) if high intrinsic work motivation and low self-control effort act as mediating mechanisms underlying the beneficial role of need satisfaction, and (b) to what extent need satisfaction mitigates the adverse effects of high job demands (work pressure and cognitive demands) on employee recovery. Data were collected by means of a 5-day daily diary study (2 measurements daily: in the morning before work, and at the end of the workday) among 68 participants. Multilevel analyses showed that need satisfaction at work was related to a beneficial recovery state at the end of the workday, and that this association was mediated by high intrinsic work motivation and low self-control effort. Furthermore, need satisfaction attenuated the adverse effects of high work pressure on employee recovery. All in all, this study increased our understanding of employees’ daily effort and recovery processes at work, and highlighted the beneficial role of need satisfaction at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • On the front lines: Stakeholder threat cues determine how identified employees cope with scandal.
    When organizational identity is threatened as a result of scandal, highly identified members who represent the threatened organization to stakeholders have a particularly challenging and overlooked experience. Addressing a theoretical paradox, we propose that organizational identification interacts with the threat cues from stakeholders to determine employee responses. We conducted a multimethod, in vivo test of these ideas with university fundraising employees after events threatened the university’s moral identity. Interview and archival data demonstrated that stakeholders expressed identity threat to fundraisers, who experienced their own identity-related distress and engaged in both group-dissociative and group-affirming responses. Surveys of professional and student university fundraisers demonstrated that more identified employees were more distressed (e,g., felt anxious, grief, betrayed) regardless of stakeholder threat cues. Yet, when employees perceived weak threat cues from stakeholders, more identified members were less likely to dissociate from the group and more likely to affirm the group’s positive identity with stakeholders. These benefits of identification were not present when the stakeholder threat cues were strong. We discuss future research and practical implications of front-line employee identification and stakeholder cues during scandal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
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