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Journal of Occupational Health Psychology - Vol 21, Iss 3

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Journal of Occupational Health Psychology The Journal of Occupational Health Psychology publishes research, theory, and public policy articles in occupational health psychology, an interdisciplinary field representing a broad range of backgrounds, interests, and specializations. Occupational health psychology concerns the application of psychology to improving the quality of worklife and to protecting and promoting the safety, health, and well-being of workers. The Journal has a threefold focus on the work environment, the individual and the work family interface.
Copyright 2016 American Psychological Association
  • Going to work ill: A meta-analysis of the correlates of presenteeism and a dual-path model.
    Interest in presenteeism, attending work while ill, has flourished in light of its consequences for individual well-being and organizational productivity. Our goal was to identify its most significant causes and correlates by quantitatively summarizing the extant research. Additionally, we built an empirical model of some key correlates and compared the etiology of presenteeism versus absenteeism. We used meta-analysis (in total, K = 109 samples, N = 175,965) to investigate the correlates of presenteeism and meta-analytic structural equation modeling to test the empirical model. Salient correlates of working while ill included general ill health, constraints on absenteeism (e.g., strict absence policies, job insecurity), elevated job demands and felt stress, lack of job and personal resources (e.g., low support and low optimism), negative relational experiences (e.g., perceived discrimination), and positive attitudes (satisfaction, engagement, and commitment). Moreover, our dual process model clarified how job demands and job and personal resources elicit presenteeism via both health impairment and motivational paths, and they explained more variation in presenteeism than absenteeism. The study sheds light on the controversial act of presenteeism, uncovering both positive and negative underlying mechanisms. The greater variance explained in presenteeism as opposed to absenteeism underlines the opportunities for researchers to meaningfully investigate the behavior and for organizations to manage it. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Correction to Petrou, Demerouti, and Schaufeli (2015).
    Reports an error in "Job crafting in changing organizations: Antecedents and implications for exhaustion and performance" by Paraskevas Petrou, Evangelia Demerouti and Wilmar B. Schaufeli (Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2015[Oct], Vol 20[4], 470-480). In the article, there were misreported variables in one of the figures. The legend for Figure 1 should read “Tested SEM model. χ² = 76.50, df = 30, p .000, CFI = 0.98, TLI = 0.92, GFI = .98, RMSEA = .05, RMR = .05; significant synchronous correlations are displayed without their coefficients for clarity purposes. *p ≤ .05.**p ≤ .01.” (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-12642-001.) The present study addressed employee job crafting behaviors (i.e., seeking resources, seeking challenges, and reducing demands) in the context of organizational change. We examined predictors of job crafting both at the organizational level (i.e., perceived impact of the implemented changes on the working life of employees) and the individual level (i.e., employee willingness to follow the changes). Job crafting behaviors were expected to predict task performance and exhaustion. Two-wave longitudinal data from 580 police officers undergoing organizational changes were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Findings showed that the degree to which changes influence employees’ daily work was linked to reducing demands and exhaustion, whereas employee willingness to change was linked to seeking resources and seeking challenges. Furthermore, while seeking resources and seeking challenges were associated with high task performance and low exhaustion respectively, reducing demands seemed to predict exhaustion positively. Our findings suggest that job crafting can act as a strategy of employees to respond to organizational change. While seeking resources and seeking challenges enhance employee adjustment and should be encouraged by managers, reducing demands seems to have unfavorable implications for employees. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Can job redesign interventions influence a broad range of employee outcomes by changing multiple job characteristics? A quasi-experimental study.
    Many job redesign interventions are based on a multiple mediator–multiple outcome model in which the job redesign intervention indirectly influences a broad range of employee outcomes by changing multiple job characteristics. As this model remains untested, the aim of this study is to test a multiple mediator–multiple outcome model of job redesign. Multilevel analysis of data from a quasi-experimental job redesign intervention in a call center confirmed the hypothesized model and showed that the job redesign intervention affected a broad range of employee outcomes (i.e., employee well-being, psychological contract fulfillment, and supervisor-rated job performance) through changes in 2 job characteristics (i.e., job control and feedback). The results provide further evidence for the efficacy and mechanisms of job redesign interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • The influence of family-supportive supervisor training on employee job performance and attitudes: An organizational work–family intervention.
    Training supervisors to increase their family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) has demonstrated significant benefits for employee physical health, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among employees with high levels of family-to-work conflict in prior research in a grocery store context. We replicate and extend these results in a health care setting with additional important employee outcomes (i.e., employee engagement, organizational commitment, and supervisor ratings of job performance), and consider the role of the 4 dimensions underlying the FSSB. Using a quasi-experimental, pretest–posttest design, 143 health care employees completed surveys at 2 time periods approximately 10 months apart, along with their supervisors who provided ratings of employees’ job performance. Between these surveys, we offered their supervisors FSSB training; 86 (71%) of these supervisors participated. Results demonstrated significant and beneficial indirect effects of FSSB training on changes in employee job performance, organizational commitment, engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions through changes in employee perceptions of their supervisor’s overall FSSBs. Further analyses suggest that these indirect effects are due primarily to changes in the creative work–family management dimension of FSSB. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Family, employment, and individual resource-based antecedents of maternal work–family enrichment from infancy through middle childhood.
    This study used data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 1,019) to examine family, employment, and individual antecedents of maternal work–family enrichment from infancy through middle childhood. Work–family conflict and important confounding factors were controlled. From the family domain, higher income-to-needs ratio and social support were associated with higher work–family enrichment. From the employment domain, greater job rewards, benefits of employment for children, and work commitment were associated with higher work–family enrichment. From the individual domain, higher maternal education and extroversion were associated with higher work–family enrichment. No family, employment, and individual characteristics were associated with work–family conflict across time except for partner intimacy. In general, the results supported antecedents of work–family enrichment that supply needed resources. The present study contributed to the literature by identifying antecedents of maternal work–family enrichment across early child developmental stages, which goes beyond examinations of particular life stages and a work–family conflict perspective. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Abusive supervision, psychosomatic symptoms, and deviance: Can job autonomy make a difference?
    Recently, interest in abusive supervision has grown (Tepper, 2000). However, little is still known about organizational factors that can reduce its adverse effects on employee behavior. Based on the Job Demands–Resources Model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001), we predict that job autonomy acts as a buffer of the positive relationship between abusive supervision, psychosomatic symptoms and deviance. Therefore, when job autonomy is low, a higher level of abusive supervision should be accompanied by increased psychosomatic symptoms and thus lead to higher production deviance. When job autonomy is high, abusive supervision should fail to produce increased psychosomatic symptoms and thus should not lead to higher production deviance. Our model was explored among a sample of 170 supervisor–subordinate dyads from 4 organizations. The results of the moderated mediation analysis supported our hypotheses. That is, abusive supervision was significantly related to production deviance via psychosomatic symptoms when job autonomy was low, but not when job autonomy was high. These findings suggest that job autonomy buffers the impact of abusive supervision perceptions on psychosomatic symptoms, with consequences for production deviance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Ethnic minorities’ paranoia and self-preservative work behaviors in response to perceived ethnic discrimination, with collective self-esteem as a buffer.
    The present research examines (a) how ethnic minorities’ paranoia mediates the relations between perceived ethnic discrimination and 2 forms of self-preservative work behaviors and (b) how ethnic minorities’ collective self-esteem moderates the relation between perceived ethnic discrimination and paranoia. Two field studies focusing on 2 ethnic minority groups (Asian and Latino/Hispanic Americans), respectively, rendered empirical support to the focal mechanisms, which appeared robust even when perceived ethnic acceptance, psychological needs satisfaction, and neuroticism were simultaneously accounted for. Specifically, paranoia mediated the relations between perceived ethnic discrimination and voice and between perceived ethnic discrimination and workplace withdrawal. Collective self-esteem attenuated the relation between perceived ethnic discrimination and paranoia. These key findings shed light on the emotional and behavioral implications of perceived ethnic discrimination in the workplace and highlight collective self-esteem as a critical factor that attenuates the negative emotional consequence of perceived ethnic discrimination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • A concise, content valid, gender invariant measure of workplace incivility.
    The authors present a short, valid, gender invariant measure of workplace incivility that should have a high degree of utility in a variety of research designs, especially those concerned with reducing participant burden such as experience sampling and multiwave longitudinal designs. Given ongoing concerns about the psychometric properties of workplace mistreatment constructs, they validated a 4-item measure of experienced incivility based on series of 3 independent field studies (N = 2,636). In addition to retaining items on the basis of employee rated conceptual alignment (i.e., judgmental criteria) with a standard incivility definition (i.e., ambiguous intent to harm), items were also chosen based on external criteria in terms of their ability to explain incremental variance in outcomes of interest (e.g., role overload, interpersonal deviance). Items with large systematic relationships with other mistreatment constructs (i.e., abusive supervision, supervisor undermining) were excluded. In turn, the authors demonstrated that the 4-item measure is gender invariant, a critical issue that has received limited attention in the literature to date. They also experimentally investigated the effect of recall window (2 weeks, 1 month, 1 year) and found a differential pattern of effect sizes for various outcomes of interest. A fourth independent field study was conducted as a practical application of the measure within a longitudinal framework. An autoregressive model examining experienced incivility and counterproductive work behaviors was tested. Data was collected from a sample of 278 respondents at 3 time points with 1 month between assessments. Implications of these findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • A multilevel examination of affective job insecurity climate on safety outcomes.
    Previous research has established a causal link between individual perceptions of job insecurity and safety outcomes. However, whether job insecurity climate is associated with safety outcomes has not been studied. The purpose of the current study was to explore the main and cross-level interaction effects of affective job insecurity climate on safety outcomes, including behavioral safety compliance, reporting attitudes, workplace injuries, experienced safety events, unreported safety events, and accident underreporting, beyond individual affective job insecurity. With 171 employees nested in 40 workgroups, multilevel analyses revealed that the negative impacts of individual affective job insecurity on safety outcomes are exacerbated when they occur in a climate of high affective job insecurity. These results are interpreted in light of safety management efforts and suggest that efforts to create a secure climate within one’s workgroup may reap safety-related benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • “Do positive affectivity and boundary preferences matter for work–family enrichment? A study of human service workers”: Correction to McNall, Scott, and Nicklin (2015).
    Reports an error in "Do positive affectivity and boundary preferences matter for work–family enrichment? A study of human service workers" by Laurel A. McNall, Lindsay D. Scott and Jessica M. Nicklin (Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2015[Jan], Vol 20[1], 93-104). In the article there was an error in Figure 1. The lower left bubble should read “Boundary Preference Toward Segmentation” instead of “Boundary Preference Toward Integration.” (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-44477-001.) More individuals than ever are managing work and family roles, but relatively little research has been done exploring whether boundary preferences help individuals benefit from multiple role memberships. Drawing on Greenhaus and Powell’s (2006) work–family enrichment theory, along with Boundary Theory (Ashforth, Kreiner, & Fugate, 2000) and Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 2002), we explore the impact of personal characteristics as enablers of work–family enrichment, and in turn, work outcomes relevant to human service workers: turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. In a 2-wave study of 161 human service employees, we found that individuals high in positive affectivity were more likely to experience both work-to-family and family to-work enrichment, whereas those with preferences toward integration were more likely to experience work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment). In turn, work-to-family enrichment (but not family to-work enrichment) was related to lower turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion. Enrichment served as a mediating mechanism for only some of the hypothesized relationships. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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