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Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research - Vol 69, Iss 1

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Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research is published by the Educational Publishing Foundation in collaboration with the Division of Consulting Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 13). The mission of this journal is to facilitate the exchange of knowledge and ideas regarding the field of consultation to the community of psychologists and others interested in consultation.
Copyright 2017 American Psychological Association
  • From here to certainty: Becoming CEO and how a trusted leadership advisor (TLA) helped the client get there.
    An in-depth case study is used to illustrate the transition senior consultants can make from the role of executive coach to a role conceptualized by the author as trusted leadership advisor (TLA) in long-term engagements with senior business executives. In this engagement, spanning several years, the client ultimately became CEO of a global entity. Factors addressed in the case include the client’s development issues, his progress, and the challenge of his simultaneously making developmental progress while managing a difficult boss and understanding how the company culture in some ways exacerbated his leadership issues. A number of key practice factors are specified as potential guidance for practitioners already working or aspiring to work with CEOs and other senior business leaders. These factors, embedded in the application of an integrated practice model, include how the TLA guided and conceptualized the engagement, useful tools including written summaries and constructive triangulation, and the management of multiple roles. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • One leader’s reflections on a trusted leadership advisor: A personal commentary.
    Comments on the article “From here to certainty: Becoming CEO and how a trusted leadership advisor (TLA) helped the client get there” by Karol Wasylyshyn. The author, a physician, talks about how the case study in the article resonates with his own work with Dr. Wasylyshyn, which started as an executive-coaching relationship but over time transitioned into her becoming his TLA, taking him from academic medicine, to being an executive in a pharmaceutical company, to being an effective senior leader, to being an executive coach and TLA himself. And he describes how her use of four role dimensions and model agility helped him develop trust and reach the personal harmony state of presence. He ends by seconding her call “that current... TLAs... remain as certain and fearless as we need to be to foster the ongoing certainty and fearlessness of our clients.” (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Transitioning into the role of trusted leadership advisor.
    Comments on the article “From here to certainty: Becoming CEO and how a trusted leadership advisor (TLA) helped the client get there” by Karol Wasylyshyn. After providing some background on the distinguished coaching career of Dr. Wasylyshyn and the author’s relationship with her, this paper points out that the case study in the article highlights two important issues related to being a TLA. First, it underscores the importance of the external coach and the senior HR executive forming an effective partnership—a relationship that, along with the manager of the executive being coached, forms the “triangle of support” on behalf of the client executive. Second, it provides a methodology for the transition from executive coach to TLA. Her theory-in-practice sets a compass for other coaches to follow when they find themselves in situations where they can purposely move into the TLA role once they have completed a successful coaching engagement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Toward a deeper understanding of the role of trusted leadership advisor, and knowing if you are ready for it.
    Comments on the article "From here to certainty: Becoming CEO and how a trusted leadership advisor (TLA) helped the client get there" by Karol Wasylyshyn. Observing that the TLA, as described in this case study, brings the executive coaching space to a higher level of engagement for the psychologist/coach and the client and that it could help differentiate consulting psychologists dealing with an increasingly commoditized market from the large number of nonpsychologists offering coaching support for executives, this paper notes that anyone who would take on the TLA role should especially consider two points: First, it requires a very high level of skill, which may be obscured in the case study by Dr. Wasylyshyn's master-level ability; and, second, there are issues with respect to the APA Ethics Code, such as the guidelines related to multiple relationships, that must be dealt with. The TLA is an exciting development that should be carefully discussed and researched. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Reflections on Wasylyshyn’s trusted leadership advisor case study.
    Comments on the article "From here to certainty: Becoming CEO and how a trusted leadership advisor (TLA) helped the client get there" by Karol Wasylyshyn. This commentary acknowledges the value of Dr. Wasylyshyn's model of integrated practice for TLAs, especially noting its simplicity, which, in contrast to many scholarly models that attempt to assist psychologists in the complex activity of organizational consulting, will make it memorable and useable. It is also noted, however, that the model requires a high level of skill to implement, as evidenced by the case study. Four aspects of the practice of advising senior business leaders that require advanced skill, and which need to be further researched and discussed, are then suggested: the use of metaphors and symbols, interventions beyond the client, ambassadorial role versus advocate, and the TLA role. These aspects are illustrated with examples from the case and from the author's own practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • Trusted leadership advisor: A commentary on expertise and ethical conundrums.
    This commentary briefly overviews the major aspects of Wasylyshyn's (2017) paper in which she continues to make her case for the need for a trusted leadership advisor (TLA) who can provide a form of individual consulting intervention clearly distinguishable from routine executive coaching. Key aspects of the paper are examined and brought into focus. In addition, the commentary argues that becoming a TLA can be understood clearly as a form of differentiable expertise in executive coaching done by individuals with a highly recognizable set of competencies and expertise. The commentary also reviews several specific ethical problems routinely faced by senior consulting psychologists in providing these services and the nearly complete absence of clarity or of paradoxical inconsistencies in the current APA Ethics Code for resolving these challenges. The commentary suggests that all practitioners in psychology be consistently exposed to and trained in virtue ethics as one way of supporting their ability to do moral reasoning in mature ways and thus cope more effectively with these types of inescapable ethical conundrums. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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  • What research on learning transfer can teach about improving the impact of leadership-development initiatives.
    The worldwide effort to improve organizational performance through leadership development has been impressive, with huge sums of money being devoted to it each year. Unfortunately, the evaluation of the impact of leadership development has not kept pace, resulting in little evidence-based guidance for creating programs and interventions. There is a significant and relevant area of research that can contribute to evaluation but that has often been neglected in the leadership-development field: the work on learning transfer. This article provides a brief practical review of the literature on learning transfer and the conditions that make it possible for people to apply in the workplace what they learn from a development initiative. This is followed by a report on an initial study of how managers in the Danish public sector perceive their organizations in terms of 9 key transfer conditions identified in the review. The article closes with a discussion of the implications of the review and study for current practice and for future research, with the goal of gaining a better understanding of the ways learning-transfer conditions affect the learning outcomes of formal leadership-development activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
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